Student Stress and Its Effect On Everyday Life

Student+Stress+and+Its+Effect+On+Everyday+Life

Anna McConnell, Writer

Everyone has experienced stress–the not-so-simple, powerfully manipulative feeling that the human body possesses– at some point in their lives. Finding the words to describe such emotion is difficult. However, the best way I can help you understand is by inviting you into the lives and stresses of some of my interviewees who took the time to answer my questions about the stress involving their school workload.

EMME WEIMER:

Anna McConnell: Has stress in high school affected your life outside of school?

Emme Weimer: Yes.

Anna McConnell: In what way has is done so?

Emme Weimer: I often feel stress outside of school. I often feel stressed about going back to school because, in our society, where we are constantly judged, I worry that I may make the wrong move. Stress is often evoked by teachers who favor students for not only their brains but their brawn. By causing us to always think about school with homework and tests, it often causes a stressful environment at home. The fact of the matter is that I worry that if I fail a test or quiz my whole future will be ruined.

Anna McConnell: Studies show that common reasons for stress are fear of failure, tougher academics, social pressure, and concerns about college. Does this surprise you?

Emme Weimer: No, it doesn’t surprise me because the school and the school environment is very stressful.

Anna McConnell: What do you think could help reduce stress for students?

Emme Weimer: An environment where students can have freedom out of school and not always doing hours of school work, studying, and activities that become repetitive.

ANONYMOUS:

Anna McConnell: Has stress in high school affected your life outside of school?

Anonymous: Yes.

Anna McConnell: In what way has is done so?

Anonymous: I get stressed out mostly over homework and tests. It is my fault for putting it off, but our generation today has so many more distractions than it had years ago. I’m constantly on my phone or watching TV, and I’d honestly rather do those things than my homework. I often hold things off until the last minute which stresses me out. What stresses me out more, though, is tests and my grades. I stress myself out and get nervous that I will mix up the tests and get a bad grade.

Anna McConnell: Studies show that common reasons for stress are fear of failure, tougher academics, social pressure, and concerns about college. Does this surprise you?

Anonymous: No, that doesn’t surprise me. I think that the majority of stress comes from school or work. I tend to be more stressed when I’m given more work with a smaller amount of time.

Anna McConnell: What do you think could help reduce stress for students?

Anonymous: Some ways to reduce stress for students would be to maybe give less work or more time to do work in school. Some students also stay after school for extracurricular activities and don’t have enough time to finish everything given that night. The teachers don’t collaborate with each other from other subjects.

Regardless of its negative effects, stress can impact students’ lives positively by forcing them to turn in assignments sooner rather than later or to study more throughout the week as a big test approach. Needless to say, the negative effects of stress can weigh down students and even become life-threatening in some cases.

Over the past decade, suicide rates have increased by 56% in the US, along with anxiety and depression in teens. Many studies show that stressful situations in and out of school can lead to harmful thoughts and suicide among teens in the US. With this information, what can schools do to better help their students with stress? Some schools encourage their students to speak with their guidance counselor, teachers, fellow students, or a guardian if they are experiencing an overwhelming amount of stress in their lives.

As I interviewed students from Shawnee, I found it interesting that many of them briefly mentioned the idea of teachers giving less homework and more study time for tests. While some may say the suggestion is based on laziness or procrastination, I believe that this idea can be very beneficial to the mental and physical health of all Shawnee students.

Needless to say, the stress in schools across the globe can become dangerous and, in the worst cases, even deadly. My biggest suggestion to those who are experiencing an overwhelming amount of stress would be to talk to someone who you are close to, or release your frustration/anxiety with something you like to do. Millions of children suffer each year from stress, so as you push through the darkness, know that YOU are not alone!